Thứ Năm, 31 tháng 3, 2016

What a Navy SEAL Can Teach You about Manufacturing Excellence

United States Navy SEAL Rorke Denver had the entire audience up on its feet for some light calisthenics. “I want you to stretch your arms up over head,” he instructed the crowd. “Point them right up to the ceiling.”

Commander Denver was delivering the opening keynote at the 2016 SAP Aerospace & Defense Innovation Days event in Dallas, Texas. Among those reaching for the sky were representatives from many of the top companies in the A&D industry.

Denver, who has directed all phases of basic and advanced SEAL training, was about to make an important point about the limits of performance.

“Now give me one more inch,” he said.

As the SEAL Commander expected, every hand went up just a little bit higher.

“There’s always room for improvement.”

Building the World’s Most Advanced Fighter Jet

For the next two days, the veracity of Denver’s observation was borne out by virtually every presenter at the event. Leaders from across the industry swapped ideas and shared the innovative solutions they use to meet their most complex manufacturing challenges.

Much of the talk centered around how digital technologies are helping companies continually improve operations – from managing multi-billion dollar programs to sourcing individual parts.

Lockheed Martin Corporation’s Eric R. Branyan described what can only be called a mega-project.

 

Branyan is vice president of the company’s F-35 Lightening II aircraft production business unit. The F-35 is the world’s most advanced multi-role fighter jet. It combines the latest stealth design, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations, and advanced sustainment.

The scope of the ongoing F-35 production is mind-blowing.

Branyan explained that a single F-35 is the synthesis of more than 300,000 individual parts. “Eight million lines of code fly on this airplane,” he added. “And it’s supported by another 10 million on the ground for maintenance and training.”

In total, the F-35 represents a massive and global supply chain requiring incredible coordination. There are over 1,450 domestic suppliers and more in 11 other countries. The lead times on some parts are measured in years.

Making significant improvements in this environment might seem especially difficult. But as Branyan told the crowd, the program’s goals for the next few years include increasing production rates three-fold while reducing costs 30%.

He considers continual refinements to the project’s processes, automated tools, and production methods critical to achieving these objectives. And as Branyan noted, “We will also continue to look at how our IT investments and our enterprise systems can integrate together to help meet the challenge.”

Manufacturing at Sea

In other presentations, A&D experts discussed larger trends within the industry. One in particular talked about the revolution in managing manufacturing and parts.

“Today there is $1.8 trillion worth of inventory sitting on shelves in the United States alone,” said Alan Amling, vice president of marketing at UPS Global Logistics & Distribution.

But what if we could store much of that inventory virtually and create a spare part only if and when it is actually needed?

Amling and co-presenter Steven Kim of SAP, talked about how 3D printing is transforming the extended supply chain with advantages such as no minimum quantities, no upfront tooling costs, faster production, and cost-effective customizations. This technology is revolutionizing the industry and has challenged UPS to build out a new business model.

“The 3D market is expected to triple over the next three years,” noted Amling. “If you can imagine that just 5% of manufacturing moves to 3D printing, that would represent $640 billion.”

Additive manufacturing techniques are already part of the aerospace and defense industry. Kim described how a 3D printer is now aboard the United States Navy’s USS Essex. Sailors have used the printer to create spare parts needed for emergency repairs and to build custom-made drones while far out at sea.

The Best Get Better

These are just a couple highlights from this year’s event. Look for future blogs where I’ll take a deeper dive into some of the other topics that had attendees talking among themselves.

In the meantime, here’s another comment from Commander Denver to consider.

“How do you get better when you are already performing at a very high level?” Denver asked during his opening remarks. “As SEALs we are constantly adapting and updating our advanced systems and training to ensure we can meet our objectives out on the battlefield.”

It appears that the United States Navy SEALs and the companies of the aerospace and defense industry have something in common.

Even in elite organizations, you can always find ways to give that extra inch.

Please join me on Twitter at @JohnGWard3.

Did you miss the SAP Aerospace & Defense Innovation Days in Dallas? If so, come see our A&D experts at the upcoming SAPPHIRE NOW and ASUG Annual Conference in Orlando this May 17-19. And click here to learn about SAP solutions and expertise for the aerospace and defense industry.

This story originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.

Top image via Shutterstock.



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Thứ Tư, 30 tháng 3, 2016

Budget Billing Plan (statistical) payments

Hi Experts,

 

I'm new into Budget billing plan procedures and I have some doubts on how should the amounts be cleared in the BBP statistical procedure.

I set a clearing restriction (1) to the BBP request transactions so that the requested amouts are only cleared during invoicing, this makes all payments posted to the customer account as On-account payments and manual clearing have to be executed to clear payments against the periodic consumption invoice.

-> is this the process correct ?

Otherwise, is there a way to have these payments taken into accounts when invoicing (deducted from the periodic bill)? if so, could somone guide me through the customizing activities to achieve this ?

 

Thanks in advance

Karim



Fast Tracking Digitization at SAP Labs China

SAP Labs in China has developed a unique path to help customers accelerate their digital journey.

Beijing Shunxin Holding Group Co., Ltd. is one of the largest corporations in China. Primarily dedicated to agriculture and food production, its subsidiaries cover a wide variety of industries including real estate development, financial services, and water conservancy and hydropower.

But Shunxin – as the company is known locally – wants to go digital so they can lead the next wave of agricultural industrialization in China.

To do that, Shunxin chose the SAP S/4 HANA platform and worked with SAP Labs China to go live quickly. Shunxin achieved this goal, and by October 2015, was the first customer in SAP Greater China customer to complete an SAP S/4 HANA pilot project. So far, Shunxin has brought 10 subsidiaries live on the platform. In 2016, they intend to move the holding company’s main business operations on to SAP S/4 HANA.

The “Customer Circle Program” helped fast track digitization for Shunxin. SAP Labs China and the Globalization Services team in Shanghai created this unique program to help customers become early adopters of the latest and greatest technology – from Internet of Things (IoT) solutions to line-of-business applications.

Dr. Ruiching Li heads up SAP Labs China, which includes sites in Shanghai, XiAn, Chengdu, Nanjing and Beijing, and led his team to pioneer this methodology. According to Ruiching, “We help bridge the data delta when new products are introduced. By educating the field and our partners, SAP China Labs plays a special role supporting early customer adoption and building lighthouse customers for our newest innovations.”

Ruiching continued, “With the Customer Circle Program, we sponsor the creation of new products financially but also, we enable developers to sit side-by-side with the customer in the field and understand their challenges. Using design thinking, our team helps the customers understand how SAP innovation can solve their business problems. Finally, Customer Circle program facilitates a ‘knowledge transfer’ from Labs to the field and partners, which helps make solution adoption scalable across SAP Greater China.”

Ruicheng Li (20)

Dr. Ruiching Li heads up SAP Labs China.

SAP Labs around the world collaborate closely with customers. What differentiates the China labs is its commitment to shape the local market and empower the field to make sure lines of communication remain open between the business, its IT department and SAP developers.

Clas Neumann, Senior Vice President, Head of SAP Labs Network and Fast Growth Market says: “China is in a unique of position because they have strong services and product and innovation teams here. These team acts almost as a consultancy, and enable a high degree of customer co-innovation.”

Clas continues, “The Labs in China originally focused on creating excellent global products. Now with the size of the China market and needs of the industry here, you can’t just create products to ship to the rest of the world. It’s about working to create products that address the needs of Chinese customers, like Internet of Things for manufacturing. When we have a project, we develop it at the customer site. We develop it for the customer, but along the way we also learn new best practices for developers.”

Another example is the Wuhan Asia Heart Hospital. The SAP China Labs team joined forced with the hospital to improve the quality of healthcare service using mobile technology, SAP CRM, SAP HANA and healthcare solutions. Developers digitized care and built a solution that provided a full view of patients’ activities, treatment and care – which extended beyond the hospital perimeter.

SAP is committed to China as its second home. Programs like the Customer Circle Program will certainly help it succeed because it promotes successful local adoption of solutions – and ensures that SAP is in listening mode with local customers, working together to design the kinds of products that will help China stabilize and grow its economy.



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A New Code for Football

KickApp_PPT

The first three of the six stages of the KickApp Cup competition have already been runaway successes.

Now the SAP Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) team and SAP partner streetfootballworld are bringing the KickApp Cup to six SAP Labs locations around the world. Each time, SAP colleagues from the Products & Innovation organization work together with young football players in small teams to develop apps designed to make the work of local streetfootballworld partners easier in their sport’s projects and social engagements.

Football and IT: A Dream Duo

The competitions not only build teamwork and social interaction, but also create opportunities in the subjects of mathematics, computer science, the natural sciences, and technology, transforming dreams into real prospects.Providing long-term support to socially disadvantaged children and teens is the focus of the KickApp Cup. After all, passion for football transcends social and national boundaries. It is this incredible potential that brings SAP and streetfootballworld to the table.

Passion for football transcends social and national boundaries.

“The KickApp Cup gives youngsters the chance to share their ideas with experienced IT experts from SAP. This experience will expand their horizons and help them to start a career in the technology sector,” says Vishal Talreja, co-founder and CEO of the local partner in Bangalore “Dream a Dream,” as he summarizes the vision of the KickApp Cup event organizers.

And its working.

“The KickApp Cup has provided me with great insights in the app development process. I really liked to work with the SAP developers, because they were always there to clear my doubts,” said football addict Veeresh from Bangalore. “Having made this experience I am very much interested in working in the field of technology.”

SAP Colleagues: “Personal and Professional Enrichment”

“The event was much more than expected. More challenging. More tiring. More exciting. More socially relevant. It took great effort from all of us. Everyone did their best and it was reflected on the results of the event. I am proud and happy to have worked with everyone I met on the kickapp cup,” beams SAP employee Carlos Bareiro Escobar talking about his experiences during the KickApp Cup hackathon in Sao Leopoldo.

“I like soccer, software development and helping people,” is how Jean Rigotti from SAP describes his reasons for taking part in the KickApp Cup. He and his colleagues from Brazil, India, and Germany praised the  range of skills that they could bring to the KickApp Cup and receive  training in. Thinking outside the box, finding out about new tools and technologies in programming, and working closely in a team of SAP colleagues and customers are just some examples.

More Than a Typical Hackathon

One feature of the KickApp Cup even delighted experienced hackathon veterans: the customer remains part of the team for the whole time. Not only do the young football players bring with them their ideas of what the app should be able to do, but they also design, chat, play football, relax, and celebrate side-by-side with SAP colleagues for the whole three days.

This rich team building between SAP employees and disadvantaged young people is crucial to the KickApp Cup. “The young football players were very enthusiastic, they showed a lot of effort in helping us develop the app,” says Jean, recalling the competition in Sao Leopoldo. In addition to programming, there were many other joint activities to encourage active involvement, just as in Bangalore and Walldorf – not least the football variant “football3” devised by streetfootballworld to foster inclusion.

Rich team building between SAP employees and disadvantaged young people is crucial to the KickApp Cup.

“The combination of kicking and coding means to me a unique and intense experience that had contributed in several levels for my professional and personal growth,” says design thinking coach Bárbara Reis.

The Big Final

For Thomas Jansen and his fellow members in  the German team, it is clear that they need to remain on the ball for the final push. “We obviously want to stay involved in the ongoing development of our prototype,” he says. “We’re also super excited to meet the other teams and check out their ideas!”

The next stage of the KickApp Cup is in Palo Alto, US, from March 31 to April 2. This is followed by Budapest, Hungary, and Ra’anana, Israel, in May. But what kind of football tournament would it be without a big final? All the victorious teams will meet at the SAP headquarters in Walldorf from June 30 to July 5. And then it’s on to Lyon for the streetfootballworld festival — an official event of the UEFA football European Championships — where the teams can soak up the football fever and show off the sporting spirit and innovation of their creative app prototypes.

Bárbara summarizes the ultimate goal: “Our dream is to actually make the prototype real and offer the app to NGOs like streetfootballworld.”

APPSTOSS, GermanyGermany_Gewinner_500

Host location: Walldorf
Date: July 16–18, 2015
Local partners: Badischer Fußballverband, Stifter-helfen.de
Winning app: Coach+
Video: Kicking and Coding

 

Brazil_Gewinner_1_500KickApp Cup, Brazil

Host location: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil
Date: November 19–21, 2015
Local partner: ACM
Winning team: Gol da Vida
Video: KickApp Cup – Kicking and Coding for a better life

 

KickApp Cup, IndiaIndia_Gewinner_500

Host location: Bangalore
Date: February 11–13, 2016
Local partner: Dream a Dream
Winning team: Goal4change
Video: KickApp Cup 2016 @ SAP Labs India



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How is Digitization Connected with Sustainability?

Digitization is the word on everyone’s lips. Businesses, governments, and other public organizations are busy trying to define their own digital roadmap. But how is this connected with sustainability?

Events like the United Nations (UN) Conference on Climate Change in Paris or the World Economic Forum in Davos made clear that if businesses want to survive, they have to learn how to become sustainable. And digitization plays a key role in enabling this.

The free massive open online course (MOOC) “Sustainability through Digital Transformation” aims to show the opportunities digitization offers to further drive sustainability. The course allows learners to explore how technology power can help companies become more successful while contributing to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

For those working in the software sector, IT seems a natural tool to solve a specific problem including those that the UN SDGs address. However, globally, the power of IT is really underestimated. Did you know for instance, that IT has a significant CO2 abatement potential? It improves transparency and automation and creates efficiency gains. Thereby, it increases resource productivity and reduces energy consumption.

But there is much more IT could do to address many of the other global challenges beyond climate change: Based on a recent McKinsey global institute report 99% of all available data is digital, but we only analyze 1 %. That indicates how much more insights could be gained through wisely applied data analytics. Yet, in many cases IT is not even considered as part of a potential solution.

To change this, we’ll look at examples of how to leverage digital innovation to transform industry sectors, including health, mobility, financial services, and education for the better. (Check out this 4-minute video to get an overview of the course content, structure and logistics.)

The three-week course is highly relevant to students and professionals alike. It is free of charge and begins April 13, with work assignments being distributed for a week at a time. This allows participants to learn whenever and wherever they want. Upon successful completion participants will receive a record of achievement from SAP.

More information about the course, including registration, is available here: Sustainability Through Digital Transformation

After registration, please inform friends, customers and partners about this course as well. The more people that understand how to leverage digital transformation to create sustainable impact, the better off we all will be in the future.

This story originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.

Top image via Shutterstock



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Thứ Ba, 29 tháng 3, 2016

The Literary Catalyst

Sumeet Shetty’s passion for reading and collecting books has fueled his curiosity, opened his mind to new opportunities, and helped him find his role as a catalyst and change agent.

Sumeet Shetty’s tryst with books began during a summer vacation in his childhood, when his parents gifted him membership to a local library in Bangalore. A trip to Sunny’s Circulating Library soon became an integral part of his daily routine. The first book he borrowed from the library was Five on a Treasure Island from the Famous Five series by Enid Blyton. It was the beginning of a lifelong affair with books.

It is not surprising then that Sumeet runs Literati, the book club at SAP Labs India and India’s largest corporate book club. This manager of a software development team in Bangalore has been able to attract some of the world’s top authors to speak at SAP’s spacious green campus on the outskirts of Bangalore, India’s third largest city.

Authors who Sumeet has interviewed at Literati include Alice Albinia, Amit Chaudhuri, Anita Nair, Ashok Ferrey, Chetan Bhagat, Pankaj Mishra, Peter James, Kiran Nagarkar, Musharraf Ali Farooqi, Shereen El Feki, Shobhaa Dé, Shehan Karunatilaka, Vikram Chandra and William Dalrymple.

How does a book club square up at a software company, where employees are better known for crafting code and developing products? Instead of a contradiction, Sumeet sees parallels between literature and coding. “Software code can be as elegant as prose. Both writers and programmers value elegance, but in different ways,” he says. “Authors value brevity in expressing their ideas through prose, and programmers try to write powerful code in the most concise way.”

How does a book club square up at a software company?

Besides that, argues Sumeet, reading contributes to a culture of curiosity – a value that SAP promotes highly among its diverse worldwide employee base of over 77,000 people. “We strive to be creative, to think in unconventional ways and to delight our customers. Inspiration comes from being open to new ideas,” he explains. Some colleagues have told him that the sessions of the book club have had a transformational effect on them.

Sumeet credits his parents for his interest in reading. He remembers having to negotiate with them for new toys or clothes, but never having to negotiate for the books that he wanted. His appetite for reading grew and so his collection of books.

Over the last five years, Sumeet has been collecting rare, fine and first editions of books. Signed books hold a special place in his heart and he has often gone to great lengths to pursue authors to sign his books. His ever-growing collection includes books signed by Alexander McCall Smith, Harold Bloom, VS Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Margaret Atwood, Jeffrey Archer, Amitav Ghosh, Pico Iyer, Yann Martel, Dan Brown, Eleanor Catton, Toni Morrison, Howard Jacobson, Peter James, Cornelia Funke, Paulo Coelho, Stephen Fry et al.

Sumeet joined SAP in 2005 as a software developer, and has since worked his way up to the role of a Development Manager in a multicultural development organization spanning three continents.

Staying over 10 years with the same technology company is unusual in Bangalore, where the next offer is just down the street. Why has he stayed so long with SAP?

“What I enjoy most is the wealth of opportunities at SAP. If you are in development and want to do something else, you can. You could move into consulting, pre-sales, sales, operations or general management,” explains Sumeet. “If you have the energy and drive, SAP supports you in whatever you want to do.”

Sumeet enjoys working closely with people of different cultures – another quality that he attributes to the world that books opened up for him at an early age. “Moderating sessions at the book club and reading voraciously have both enriched my weltanschauung (worldview) and prepared me well to work with people of different cultures.”

Sumeet does not know what the next chapter of his life at SAP will bring, but as a manager and the moderator of the book club, he feels comfortable in the role of a catalyst for transformation. “SAP gives me a unique opportunity to successfully straddle the worlds of software and literature. I see my role as a catalyst and motivator, bringing talented people together to help them achieve great outcomes.”

Just last week, during Bill McDermott’s visit to SAP Labs India, Sumeet was able to add another signed book to his collection. “Bill generously signed and inscribed a copy of his book Winners Dream for me,” explains Sumeet. “It was a great gesture, and the book is one of the jewels in my collection!” Sumeet hopes that he will have the opportunity to interview SAP’s CEO at the Literati book club on his next trip to India.

The People Behind the Technology

//name: Sumeet Shetty
//job title: Development Manager
//team: Development Services and Tools
//years at SAP: 11
//SAP lab: India
//passion: Literature, collecting books, leading India’s largest corporate book club, leadership, management

Read more stories of the People Behind the Technology.

Video by Natalie Hauck and Alex Januschke of SAP Development University.



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Buenos Aires Preserves Old Charm by Becoming a Smart City

Buenos Aires, Argetina, bursts with the old-city charm familiar in Europe. It’s even commonly referred to as the “Paris of the South.”

Over 12 million Porteños, or people of the port, call Buenos Aires home, and residents enjoy classic favorites like mate, tango, asado, antique markets, and football.  They are passionate, friendly people who take pride in their city.

Tradition is an integral part of the charm and attraction of Buenos Aires, yet because the city is so old, maintenance and cleaning operations can be more demanding than in newer cities.  For the city ministry of Buenos Aires, a modern approach to old methods of operation were necessary to maintain the safety and satisfaction of residents.

Buenos Aires is a Smart City

Beginning in 2008, the Environment and Public Spaces Ministry of the City Government of Buenos Aires (GCBA) decided that it was time to invest in updated solutions to better address issues in public administration.

Previously, the city manually tracked records on over 8,000 public service jobs a month. Under this paper-based model, resident complaints could go unanswered for as long as a year and a half and city-safety was not as strong as it could have been.

It was time for the City of Buenos Aires to ditch the paper trail and move to a modern approach that used the right technology and information systems to organize internal processes and better connect with its people.

Fielding Resident Complaints  

The GCBA receives 30,000 complaints each month.  To manage and organize the complaints, the city of Buenos Aires implemented an assortment of SAP solutions to view and organize the complaints in real time, analyze the issues, and connect with residents on social media via mobile devices.

Now, when residents see a problem like an uncovered manhole, they can tweet a picture of the issue to the ministry along with a description of the problem and the location.  From there the department plans a solution, executes it, and then posts a picture showing that the issue was rectified.

Now the city promises to fix issues in 72 to 96 hours maximum, and by leveraging the analytical power of the SAP HANA platform, the city can determine the investments necessary for fixing issues and also prioritize issues that are ranked most critical to the daily lives of residents.

Keeping the City Bright and Safe

To help reduce energy consumption and keep the city illuminated and safe, the GCBA converted 91,000 public street lights to modern LED technology.

Each light in the LED replacement project contains an antenna that communicates with a central system. This remote management system runs on SAP ERP powered by SAP HANA to provide the city with real-time insight into power outages, broken lights, and vandalism. The city can also track installation speed and contractor information in real time, saving on maintenance costs and ensuring that issues are fixed quickly, keeping the city consistently well-lit for the public’s safety.

Early Disaster Prevention

Because Buenos Aires is a port city built on nine streams, severe flooding is not uncommon.

In 2013, a disastrous flood and endless rain caused thousands of evacuations and over 50 casualties.   It was then that the GCBA decided something needed to be done to change how it handled water drainage and flooding.

With the city’s new digital system, the GCBA was able to automate maintenance on 1,500 kilometers of drainage pipes.

The new system, which leverages SAP CRM powered by SAP HANA, replaced manual equipment maintenance tasks with remote and automated systems. Now the 400 trucks that execute cleaning activities around the city each day can work at maximum capacity.

In addition, by using sensors, the city can, to a certain degree, predict flooding and notify residents of potential dangers with weather alerts.

In the future, the city wants to expand its digital transformation to optimize security, transportation, education, and healthcare.

Sometimes, in order to preserve the old, you must adapt to the new. And today, with SAP as its strategic technology partner, the City of Buenos Aires is proactively ensuring it can prevent problems before they occur.

Follow me on Twitter @Cmdonato and on LinkedIn.

This story originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.

Top image via Shutterstock



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Online Grocery Shopping on the Rise in the United States, Survey Shows

WALLDORF — One in five shoppers in the United States regularly buys groceries online, and two in five have bought groceries online in the past, a recent survey shows.

The findings of the study, commissioned by Brick Meet Click and announced by SAP SE (NYSE: SAP), show that retailers face enormous pressure to adjust internal and customer-facing business strategies to keep pace with rapidly evolving consumer demands.

“The tide is rising,” said Bill Bishop, chief architect of Brick Meets Click and primary author of the new study. “Active users spend an average of 16 percent of their weekly grocery dollars online, and that grows to 64 percent on weeks they do a major online grocery trip.”

Other key findings of the survey include:

  • The percentage of U.S. households that bought groceries online in the past 30 days has nearly doubled in just two years: 21 percent in 2015 versus 11 percent in 2013.
  • Online grocery trips are different from in-store shopping. Three themes dominate online grocery shopping:
    • Specific product shopping
    • Major grocery shopping
    • Subscription-based shopping

“A digital core is the foundation of a retailer’s digital value network,” said Lori Mitchell-Keller, global general manager of consumer industries for SAP. “Retailers that operate a true digital enterprise can empower the workforce and deliver a better user experience that goes beyond a mobile smartphone or tablet. They can respond to shoppers in real time — with a 360-degree view of the customer.”

To learn more about the results of “How Consumers Are Using Online Grocery and What It Means for Retailers in 2016,” based on responses from 12,000 U.S. shoppers, click here.

For more information, visit the SAP News Center. Follow SAP on Twitter at @sapnews and @SAP_Retail.

Media Contact:

Stacy Ries, SAP, +1 (484) 619-0411, stacy.ries@sap.com, ET

Any statements contained in this document that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements as defined in the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “project,” “predict,” “should” and “will” and similar expressions as they relate to SAP are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. SAP undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. The factors that could affect SAP’s future financial results are discussed more fully in SAP’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including SAP’s most recent Annual Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of their dates.
Top image via Shutterstock



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Integrated Report 2015 – SAP Improves its Economic, Environmental, and Social Indicators

SAP SE (NYSE: SAP) today released its integrated report for 2015, which shows, among other facts and figures, the impact of the company’s economic, social, and environmental performance on its business success.

In 2015, all of SAP’s key sustainability indicators maintained their upward trajectory. Year on year, both the employee engagement indicator and the business health culture index (BHCI) rose from their already high levels, increasing by 2 percentage points to 81% and by 3 percentages points to 75% respectively. The employee retention rate was at 91.8%, remaining within the intended range. SAP reduced its overall carbon footprint by 9% to 455 kilotons in 2015.

The integrated report expresses changes in the performance of indicators in terms of their monetary impact[1]­ on operating profit, based on a two-step calculation. In the first step, the relevant social and environmental cause-and-effect chains for SAP are identified. Then, real data from SAP is used to translate these cause-and-effect chains into a monetary effect on operating profit. Applying this method to the employee engagement index, SAP calculates that a change of 1 percentage point[2] in that index affects SAP’s operating profit by between EUR40 million and EUR50 million. As the rise in the employee engagement index at SAP in 2015 was 2 percentage points, from 79% to 81%, the gross impact[3] on operating profit was between EUR80 million and EUR100 million.

SAP finds that rises in the BHCI produce even greater gross effects on operating profit than other indicators. SAP uses the BHCI to measure how employees rate their personal well-being, their working conditions, and the leadership culture at the company. In 2015, the index climbed 3 percentage points, from 72%[4] to 75%, producing a gross effect on operating profit of between EUR225 million and EUR255 million. Because for each percentage-point change in the BHCI, the impact on operating profit is between EUR75 million and EUR85 million.[5]

In 2015, the employee retention rate[6] decreased from 93.5% to 91.8%. SAP does not strive for a general retention rate of 100%, as it believes that the current turnover rate supports its ability to innovate. The gross impact of a 1 percentage-point change in employee retention is between EUR45 million and EUR55 million.

In environmental reporting, CO2 emissions are the most important indicator. A reduction of 1% in CO2 emissions saves SAP around EUR4 million in costs. In 2015, emissions fell 9% from 500 kilotons to 455 kilotons. The company reduced CO2 emissions per employee by almost 18%, from 7.3 tons in 2014 to 6.0 tons in 2015, nearly doubling the rate of per-employee reduction year on year. SAP attributes this reduction to a variety of measures, including savings in business air travel and additional investments in CO2 offsetting projects. SAP’s switch to renewable energy resources in 2014 continues to have a positive effect: The company has been powering all of its data centers and facilities worldwide with 100% renewable electricity for the last two years.

“We believe that our economic, social, and environmental performance are inextricably linked. Measures taken in one area always impact the other areas too,” says SAP Chief Sustainability Officer, Daniel Schmid, explaining the 360-degree view that the integrated report provides. “The digital transformation is intensifying these mutual dependencies, as we will also be demonstrating in our free online course Sustainability Through Digital Transformation, starting in mid-April. This year’s integrated report, SAP’s fourth, delivers reliable explanations and information for understanding trends better and for tapping into the wealth of potential they present.”

For the first time, the integrated report also points to the opportunities that information technology offers for attaining the 17 United Nations Global Goals for Sustainable Development. For examples of how SAP and its customers are embracing these goals, go to http://ift.tt/1ObXVGt.

Note to editors

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About SAP

As the market leader in enterprise application software, SAP SE helps companies of all sizes and in all industries run better. From back office to boardroom, warehouse to storefront, desktop to mobile device – SAP empowers people and organizations to work together more efficiently and use business insight more effectively to stay ahead of the competition. SAP applications and services enable some 300,000 customers to operate profitably, adapt continuously, and grow sustainably. For more information, visit www.sap.com.

# # #

Any statements contained in this document that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements as defined in the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “project,” “predict,” “should” and “will” and similar expressions as they relate to SAP are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. SAP undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements. Such statements reflect our current views and assumptions and all forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those statements. The factors that could affect SAP’s future financial results are discussed more fully in our filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including the most recent Annual Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC. The future-oriented statements reflect the point of view at the time they were made. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

© 2016 SAP SE. All rights reserved.
SAP and other SAP products and services mentioned herein as well as their respective logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP AG in Germany and other countries. For more information about the trademarks, copyrights, and their usage, see http://ift.tt/1gK6Kcn.

Press contacts:

Bettina Wunderle, +49 7544 970-538 bettina.wunderle@sap.com, CET
Daniel Reinhardt, +49 6227 7-40201 daniel.reinhardt@sap.com, CET

[1] The integrated report does not take account of the investments required to facilitate the changes in indicators, so the financial effects described in the report therefore represent gross effects.

[2] Compared with the 2014 integrated report, SAP has increased the range of gross impact from between EUR35 million and EUR40 million to between EUR40 million and EUR45 million. This reflects an increase in headcount and higher personnel costs per employee. Both factors are included in the calculation of financial impact.

[3] It makes sense to look at the cumulative effects of factors within a single indicator. However, adding up the effects of different indicators does not deliver reliable information because each of the indicators creates impacts on others. For example, employee engagement impacts employee retention.

[4] In 2014, the business health culture index stood at 70%. The gross effect of shifts in this indicator was recalculated for the 2015 integrated report to take account of changes that SAP made in 2015 to the design of the employee survey on which the indicator is based.

[5] An increase in headcount and personnel costs led to the range of gross effects being raised. Set at EUR65 million to EUR75 million, the figures calculated for 2014 were EUR10 million below the current values.

[6] The ratio of the average headcount (expressed in full-time equivalents/FTEs) minus employee-initiated terminations divided by the average headcount, taking into account the past 12 months.

Photo: Shutterstock



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SAP Announces Availability of Integrated Report 2015 and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Filing of Annual Report on Form 20-F

WALLDORF, Germany – SAP SE (NYSE: SAP) today announced that the SAP Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2015 has been filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and is accessible online at http://ift.tt/1pXtmRj.

SAP also announced that the SAP Integrated Report 2015 is now available and accessible online at http://ift.tt/PXMKLP.

In the reports, SAP reaffirmed its previously published (January 22, 2016) business outlook.

You can access PDF versions of the SAP Annual Report 2015, which is a subset of the information contained in the company’s online integrated report, and the SAP Annual Report 2015 on Form 20-F at our Investor Relations website www.sap.com/investor or www.sap.de/investor. A hard copy of the audited consolidated financial statements can also be requested by sending an email to investor@sap.com or via phone +49 6227 7-67336.

About SAP

As market leader in enterprise application software, SAP (NYSE: SAP) helps companies of all sizes and industries run better. From back office to boardroom, warehouse to storefront, desktop to mobile device – SAP empowers people and organizations to work together more efficiently and use business insight more effectively to stay ahead of the competition. SAP applications and services enable approximately 300,000 customers to operate profitably, adapt continuously, and grow sustainably. For more information, visit www.sap.com.

Follow SAP Investor Relations on Twitter at @sapinvestor.

For more information, financial community only:

Stefan Gruber               +49 (6227) 7-44872         investor@sap.com, CET

For more information, press only:

Nicola Leske                 +49 (6227) 7-50852         nicola.leske@sap.com, CET

Daniel Reinhardt          +49 (6227) 7-40201        daniel.reinhardt@sap.com, CET

Andy Kendzie               +1 (202) 312-3919           andy.kendzie@sap.com, ET

Note to Editors

To preview and download broadcast-standard stock footage and press photos digitally, please visit www.sap.com/photos. On this platform, you can find high-resolution material for your media channels. To view video stories on diverse topics, visit www.sap-tv.com. From this site, you can embed videos into your own Web pages, share video via email links and subscribe to RSS feeds from SAP TV.

Any statements contained in this document that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements as defined in the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “project,” “predict,” “should” and “will” and similar expressions as they relate to SAP are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. SAP undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. The factors that could affect SAP’s future financial results are discussed more fully in SAP’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including SAP’s most recent Annual Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of their dates.

©2016 SAP SE. All rights reserved.

SAP and other SAP products and services mentioned herein as well as their respective logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP SE in Germany and other countries. Please see http://ift.tt/1gK6Kcn for additional trademark information and notices.

Photo: Shutterstock



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SAP Recommends a Dividend of €1.15 per Share – Year-Over-Year Increase of 5%

WALLDORF, Germany – The Executive Board and the Supervisory Board of SAP SE (NYSE: SAP) recommend that shareholders approve a dividend of €1.15 per share for the fiscal year 2015 at the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders.

This represents a year-over-year increase of €0.05, or 5% compared to last year’s dividend of €1.10. If the shareholders approve this recommendation, the total amount of dividends to be distributed will be approximately €1.4 billion (2014: €1.3 billion), representing a pay-out ratio of 45% (2014: 40%).

SAP aims to continue its policy to pay a dividend totaling more than 35% of profit after tax in the future.

“Our successful corporate strategy was validated once again by strong performance in 2015 and we want our shareholders to participate in this success. Therefore, we have recommended increasing the dividend by 5%,” said Luka Mucic, CFO at SAP. “We have transformed our company to align with our objectives and customers are responding positively to our innovations across our on-premise, cloud, and business network offerings as we help them transform and compete in the digital economy.”

The Annual General Meeting of Shareholders is scheduled for May 12, 2016 in Mannheim, Germany. The 2015 fiscal year dividend is scheduled to be paid on or after May 13, 2016.

Note to holders of SAP ADRs (American Depositary Receipts): One SAP ADR represents one SAP SE share. The final dividend amount per ADR is dependent upon the euro/US dollar exchange rate. Since SAP SE pays cash dividends on the ordinary shares in euro, the exchange rate fluctuations will affect the US dollar amounts received by holders of ADRs. The final dividend payment by SAP SE to the depositary bank is scheduled for May 13, 2016. The depositary bank will then convert the dividend payment from euro into US dollars as promptly as practicable.

About SAP

As market leader in enterprise application software, SAP (NYSE: SAP) helps companies of all sizes and industries run better. From back office to boardroom, warehouse to storefront, desktop to mobile device – SAP empowers people and organizations to work together more efficiently and use business insight more effectively to stay ahead of the competition. SAP applications and services enable approximately 300,000 customers to operate profitably, adapt continuously, and grow sustainably. For more information, visit www.sap.com.

Follow SAP Investor Relations on Twitter at @sapinvestor.

For customers interested in learning more about SAP products:

Global Customer Center:        +49 180 534-34-24

United States Only:                 1 (800) 872-1SAP (1-800-872-1727)

For more information, financial community only:

Stefan Gruber                         +49 (6227) 7-44872                                              investor@sap.com, CET

For more information, press only:

Nicola Leske                           +49 (6227) 7-50852                                                 nicola.leske@sap.com, CET

Daniel Reinhardt                     +49 (6227) 7-40201                                                 daniel.reinhardt@sap.com, CET

Andy Kendzie                          +1 (202) 312-3919                                                 mailto:andy.kendzie@sap.com, ET

Note to Editors

To preview and download broadcast-standard stock footage and press photos digitally, please visit www.sap.com/photos. On this platform, you can find high-resolution material for your media channels. To view video stories on diverse topics, visit www.sap-tv.com. From this site, you can embed videos into your own Web pages, share video via email links and subscribe to RSS feeds from SAP TV.

Any statements contained in this document that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements as defined in the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “project,” “predict,” “should” and “will” and similar expressions as they relate to SAP are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. SAP undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. The factors that could affect SAP’s future financial results are discussed more fully in SAP’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including SAP’s most recent Annual Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of their dates.

©2016 SAP SE. All rights reserved.

SAP and other SAP products and services mentioned herein as well as their respective logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP SE in Germany and other countries. Please see http://ift.tt/1gK6Kcn for additional trademark information and notices.

Photo: Shutterstock



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Thứ Hai, 28 tháng 3, 2016

Manual Bill doc impact on Payment Plan

Hi Experts,

 

I need help on Payment Plan, Actually in my scenario customers are getting one time credit from third party, for this interface is creating manual bill doc and it is getting invoiced with next periodic bill. Since customer is on payment plan one time credit(manual bill) is not reflecting on bill print, it is getting adjusted in BB current diff amount item. My client want to give one time credit to the customer on same month and it should be shown on bill.

 

I have tried with enhancing EVENTS R999, modified manual bill docs line items to Item in bill sum total (XTOTAL_AMNT) = 'X'. it helped me in invoice total (BB amount - one time credit) but when I checked FPL9 it shows posting of BB amount. Can you please guide me this requirement? should I use other EVENT?   

 

 

 

Regards,

Noor



LSMW for MRO rev using Installation and schedule MR date

Hi Experts,

 

I have list of installations and corresponding Schedule MR date which I want to reverse , I tried using LSMW and recorded EL37 TCODE but in the recording it is not capturing 2nd screen fields because of which it is not working.

 

Any solution for this or alternate solution for reverse MRO for 1000+ Installations (I can not use MRU because I do not want reverse all MRO for a MRU)

 

Regards

Manoj



Wipro Changes with the Times – Everything But its Name

It’s hard to imagine Bangalore-based Wipro Limited as anything other than a high-tech IT organization. Just listen to how Wipro insiders describe their company.

“Wipro is a professional services organization,” says Kamal Shah, the company’s global head of information systems. “We work in the spaces of technology, outsourcing, and managed services, as well as providing business operations support.”

In fact, this multinational information technology and consulting company serves global customers in nearly two dozen industries – everything from aerospace to utilities – and it can count around 900 of the Fortune 1000 companies among its customers.

It’s definitely high-tech.

But do you know what the original Wipro name stood for? Western Indian Vegetable Products Limited.

That’s right; Wipro started back in 1945 as a manufacturer of vegetable and refined cooking oils. Then in the 1970s, the company began shifting its focus to the new opportunities offered by the rapidly evolving computer industry.

It seems that Wipro has always been looking toward the future and exploring the potential of new technologies. It’s a culture of innovation that continues to thrive throughout the company today.

Getting Ready for the Internet of Things

A good example of this forward-looking focus is Wipro’s announcement last fall of its support as a founding sponsor of the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Center for the Development and Application of Internet of Things Technologies (or CDAIT).

CDAIT – a global, non-profit, partner-funded center located in Atlanta, Georgia – was established to foster interdisciplinary research and education while driving general awareness about the Internet of Things (IoT).

With the IoT’s potential to impact virtually every sector of the economy and society, CDAIT’s researchers hope to stimulate creativity and productivity gains while addressing important issues such as privacy, ethics, regulation, and policy.

“We are happy to join forces with Georgia Tech and explore the possibilities of how the IoT explosion can transform the world in which we live,” said Dr. Alan Atkins, vice president and global head of IoT at Wipro Limited, in the announcement.

Transforming Business Systems

“Embracing the potential of the Internet of Things is certainly one of Wipro’s strategic objectives,” agrees Shah. But in a recent video, he also describes how adopting the latest software technologies in Wipro’s own business systems is helping the company better address the needs of its worldwide clients.

“We truly want to drive a culture where data becomes a core for everything we do from a decision-making perspective,” says Shah. And to help achieve this goal, Wipro is now using SAP Business Suite powered by SAP HANA, SAP S/4HANA, and such analytics tools as SAP BusinessObjects business intelligence solutions and SAP Lumira software.

One of the critical areas in which Wipro is making the most of these capabilities is when identifying the right resources and skill sets for a given customer project. “We are leveraging SAP Business Suite powered by SAP HANA and SAP S/4HANA to do a fast matchmaking between a program’s specific requirements and the large talent pool that we maintain within our organization,” explains Shah.

Looking to the Future while Honoring the Past

“The future of Wipro is very exciting,” says Shah. “We continue to identify new offerings and look for additional ways to innovate. And we know our own journey will be very closely coupled with all the exciting ventures that our customers are pursuing.”

There’s no doubt that Wipro keeps changing with the times. But make no mistake. Wipro has never lost sight of its 70-year past either.

See that colorful sunflower in the company’s logo? It’s a very intentional reminder of Wipro’s earliest days in the vegetable products industry.

Follow me on twitter @JohnGWard3.

This story originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.



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Chủ Nhật, 27 tháng 3, 2016

FP06 - Activation of submenus under Goto

Hi,

 

Would like to ask if it possible to activate the following submenus under Goto in FP06:

 

FP06_Goto.jpg

 

If yes, please advise how this can be done. Appreciate much your help on this.

 

 

Thanks,

Elvie



Thứ Bảy, 26 tháng 3, 2016

How to Handle Post dated cheque during Installment plan Creation in FICA?

Hi Experts,

 

Please let me know how to Handle Post dated cheque during the IP Creation and how it notice us if due date reached.

 

Thanks,

Abbas



Thứ Sáu, 25 tháng 3, 2016

Simplifying the Future of Learning

The buzz: Teach me tonight.

If your company’s workforce spans the generational gamut from Baby Boomers to recent college alumni born after the Boomers graduated, it’s a good thing! Talent from any source cannot be overlooked if you want to compete in the digital world.

But how do you efficiently create or adopt the training tools and techniques that speak to each employee’s individual learning style? Are there new approaches you haven’t considered?

The experts speak.

Matt Donovan, Learning Solutions Group: “The illiterate of the future will not be the person who cannot read. It will be the person who does not know how to learn.” (Alvin Toffler)

Jesse Bernal, Knoa: “If you want to succeed you should strike out on new paths, rather than travel the worn paths of accepted success.” (John D. Rockefeller)

Sohail Bhola, Tech Data Corporation: “My center is giving way, my right is in retreat; situation excellent. I shall attack.” (Ferdinand Foch)

Join us for Simplifying the Future of Learning.



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Becoming Digital, Staying Human: Be True to You and Your Business

The buzz: I’ve gotta be me!

Our appetite for online reading, viewing and buying is voracious.

How hungry are we? In just 8 minutes, Alibaba achieved $1b in sales on Singles Day November 2015. 42% of shoppers search product information on a mobile device while in-store. We spend 2 more hours a day on mobile than 3 years ago. This technology tidal wave keep us connected and social.

News flash: Small businesses want a piece of this action, too. But can they become a better, digital version of themselves without losing what makes them unique?

The experts speak.

Lil Mohan, University of Chicago: “The change we are in the middle of isn’t minor and it isn’t optional.” (Clay Shirky)

Max Dower, Unfortunate Portrait: “One machine can do the work of fifty ordinary men. No machine can do the work of one extraordinary man.” (Elbert Hubbard)

Susan Reynolds, SAP: “Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.” (Gertrude Stein)

Join us for Becoming Digital, Staying Human: Be True to You and Your Business.



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Claiming India’s Digital Dividend

Thứ Năm, 24 tháng 3, 2016

Will The Real Unicorns Please Stand Up?

Lidl Opts for SAP for Retail powered by SAP HANA

Lidl went live with a new electronic merchandise management and information system based on SAP for Retail powered by SAP HANA at its Austrian stores in May 2015. The system roll out to other countries is now in full swing.

With some 10,000 stores and over 140 logistics hubs, Lidl is one of Europe’s largest retailers. It operates in 29 countries and has retail outlets in 26 European nations. In the fiscal year 2014/2015, Lidl’s 200,000 employees generated sales of approximately €59 billion. And with its sights set firmly on further expansion, the company plans to enter the Lithuanian market in 2016, followed by Serbia and the United States in 2018.

Efficient processes are a key element in Lidl’s successful business model of offering top-quality products to millions of European customers at the best possible prices. Making sure these processes are optimized on an ongoing basis requires a powerful IT and application landscape. That’s why the company, headquartered in the southern German town of Neckarsulm, is implementing a new merchandise management and information platform ‒ “eLWIS” ‒ based on SAP for Retail powered by SAP HANA companywide as part of its IT strategy.

“This new platform is making us fit for the future,” explains Lidl’s Alexander Sonnenmoser, Divisional Board Member for Business Technology, who is responsible for the company’s entire IT.

Lidl’s switch to eLWIS was prompted by the realization that the company’s legacy merchandise management system, which had been developed in-house, was coming up against the limits of its capacity for innovation and enhancement. It was hampered by process breaks, redundant master data storage, integration gaps and functional restrictions. Moreover, a combination of myriad interfaces and modules and a decentral server structure was making the task of running and maintaining the system increasingly complex.

Although precisely tailored to Lidl’s operations, there was no getting around the fact that the legacy system would have to be enhanced if it were to offer the company new functions and opportunities in the future. With this in mind, Lidl’s requirements for the new system included:

  • End-to-end processes: Lidl wanted to replace vertical processes with horizontal ones to create a seamless supply chain from the vendor to the customer
  • Greater functional scope: inventory valuation, flow of goods management, and so on
  • State-of-the-art technologies to meet the challenges ahead
  • A centralized IT and application landscape
  • Integration capabilities, consistency, and compliance

“We were looking to map integrated process chains right through from the vendor to the customer ‒ rather than individual functions,” explains Sonnenmoser.

“That’s why we opted for the very latest technology,” adds René Sandführ, Executive Vice President IT ERP Systems, who is globally responsible for the company’s merchandise management system.

Thanks to SAP platforms and technologies, Lidl can now make inventory data and reports available in near real time and provide key information to adjacent systems. An enterprise service bus controls communication between the interacting systems to avoid data redundancy.

Lidl’s process chains were defined and implemented in SAP for Retail powered by SAP HANA, an undertaking that required the expertise of an international project team based at company headquarters and composed of members from several different countries. Representatives from various divisions and user departments defined the process chains, and key users provided practical input.

“We wanted a solution that would be acceptable to our customers, who, in this case, are our employees,” says Sandführ, explaining the basis of a successful approach to change management. In line with this strategy, employee training centers address the question what is different in the new system and why. Lidl no longer distributes user manuals to its employees, but favors an approach it calls “Lernen bei Lidl” (“Learning at Lidl”), in which employees receive part of their training directly using the system.

Lidl’s new system was implemented in a joint project with partner KPS, which took a highly agile approach based on its “Rapid Transformation Method.” Following a brief, single-weekend operation to migrate all the systems and connect up all the stores to the new system, the first of Lidl’s regional distribution center in Austria went live on May 1, 2015. The first set of orders was processed in the new system on a Saturday, and inventory reports were available in near real time.

The standards developed for eLWIS will form the basis for implementing the new system in all of Lidl’s operations. “We can use the global template in every country, which means that we’ll gather pace as we progress through the roll-out program,” says KPS Vice President Matthias Nollenberger.

“SAP for Retail powered by SAP HANA has enhanced our capacity for IT innovation,” says Sonnenmoser. “The new platform is the foundation we need to continue implementing our processes efficiently in IT systems so that we can reduce complexity and focus on providing simplicity for our customers and employees through forward-thinking concepts.”

Top image via Lidl



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Thứ Tư, 23 tháng 3, 2016

Digital Transformation – Changing the Game in the Chemical Industry

The buzz: Vite, vite! [“Faster, faster” in French]

Chemical industry leaders face new challenges, as digital technologies transform our world and drive innovation at a breathtaking rate. How will you integrate acquisitions to reap promised synergies and on-board new revenue sources faster? What about reducing complexity and streamlining workflows across your entire global value chain?

Reality check: Success in the digital era requires more than doing the same-old, only better, faster, cheaper, smarter. It demands re-imagining entire business models, business processes – the very nature of work itself.

Ready?

The experts speak.

Bob Parker, IDC: “Only the guy who isn’t rowing has time to rock the boat.” (Jean-Paul Sartre)

Michael Casey, Accenture: Marty McFly: “Hey, Doc, we better back up. We don’t have enough road to get up to 88.” Dr. Emmett Brown:

“Roads? Where we’re going, we don’t need roads…” (Back to the Future)

Stefan Guertzgen, SAP: “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” (Albert Einstein)

Join us for Digital Transformation – Changing the Game in the Chemical Industry.



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SAP at the Newseum: Big Data and Politics

Election strategist David Plouffe and POLITICO’s Ken Vogle on the role of Big Data analytics and technology in politics.

Polling, Big Data analytics and social media has become crucial tools in the hands of election strategists and catapulted those that have mastered them into political superstars. Last week, at a standing-room only event held at the Newseum in Washington, DC, SAP North America President Jen Morgan asked Karl Rove, senior advisor and deputy chief of staff to George W. Bush, and David Plouffe, campaign strategist and senior advisor to Barack Obama, about the role that Big Data and technology now play in elections.

Plouffe, who SAP News caught up with after the event, revealed that during the Obama campaign the campaign used big data analytics to “model everybody in America.”

“Everybody had a score,” he said, “and we made every decision based on those predictive models and how they moved.” Plouffe however, also drew a distinction between primary elections and the general election. “General elections have a different set of voters and the role of analytics and modeling,” he said.

Karl Rove agreed. Rove, who has been a fierce critic of current Republican front-runner Donald Trump said that if Trump doesn’t “change his understanding of the voter he’s talking to” once the primaries are over, he could be in for trouble.

Both men spoke at an event dubbed “SAP Reuters Decision 2016 Simplified” and hosted by Morgan to announce the partnership between SAP and Reuters as well as SAP’s role helping to power the news service’s polling and data journalism projects.

Reuters has deployed the SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud service as the new backbone for Reuters Polling Explorer, a web-based service that enables reporters and readers to interactively ‘slice and dice’ polling data and create powerful graphics using SAP Lumira.

The in-memory computing power of the SAP HANA platform allows Reuters to access and analyze 100 million survey responses for quicker and more efficient reporting of public opinion. Topics range from politics to entertainment, including a daily poll that will run continuously through the 2016 election cycle, making it one of the most comprehensive and accurate sources of data about the American electorate.

The Newseum event also featured a panel comprising Ken Vogel, Chief Investigative Reporter, POLITICO; Rachel Shorey, Interactive News Software Engineer, New York Times; Bryan Rich, Senior Vice President, Open Source Data Analytics, Novetta Solutions; and Simon Rogers, Data Editor, Google, all of whom discussed the impact of Big Data and technology on journalism.

Watch more videos from the event: 

Former Advisor to President Obama David Plouffe Talks to SAP TV

SAP and Reuters Team Up in the Political Arena



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Megacities and Unexpected Industries Diversify Saudi Arabia’s Economy

When you think about Saudi Arabia’s economy, you probably picture oil wells – not rolls of paper towels. That’s understandable. The petroleum sector reportedly accounts for roughly 45% of the country’s GDP.

But these days, the Kingdom is working very hard to diversify its sources of income. And both purpose-built cities and businesses like the Saudi Paper Manufacturing Company are important elements of this economic strategy.

Creating an Economic Oasis

The Economist reported that the Saudi Arabian government is investing more than $70 billion to build up to six “economic cities.” Designed from scratch with modern infrastructure and business-friendly regulations, these cities are intended to attract investment and create jobs.

King Abdullah Economic City (or KAEC) is one of these centers of commerce. Located along the coast of the Red Sea, KAEC is currently being built to include a central business district, an industrial zone, residential areas, and a modern seaport with a target capacity of 20 million containers a year.

The concept has attracted international attention. In December 2014, the American candy company Mars opened a state-of-art chocolate factory in KAEC.

Ultimately, this megacity is projected to encompass some 70 square miles – making it slightly larger than Washington, D. C. – and host more than 2 million residents.

Home-Grown Diversification

The Saudis have actually been advocating diversification for decades. Back in 1970, the government issued the first of a series of five-year development plans that called for finding additional sources of national income that could help reduce the country’s dependence on oil.

New economic zones and foreign corporations are only part of Saudi Arabia’s vision.

Headquartered in the provincial capital of Dammam, the Saudi Paper Manufacturing Company is a decidedly home-grown company.

Saudi Paper was founded in 1989 by Prince Abdullah bin Mosaad bin Abdulaziz Al Saud – the grandson of Saudi Arabia’s late King Abdulaziz. (If you’re fan of English soccer, you might be familiar with the Saudi Prince. A couple of years ago, he bought a 50% stake in the Sheffield United Football Club.)

Today, Saudi Paper is a leading supplier to the Arab world of products such as tissues, napkins, and paper towels. The company’s manufacturing facilities have a production capacity of 125,000 tons a year, and it serves domestic, regional, and international markets.

Adapting to the Desert

Paper might seem a particularly unlikely industry for Saudi Arabia. The manufacture of tissue products requires wood fiber and water – both in short supply in this desert Kingdom.

In fact, when Saudi Paper built the largest paper manufacturing mill in the region, one industry publication called it “a brave move” when you considered the country’s aridity and the lack of raw material sources. But Saudi Paper met these challenges head-on with creative thinking and advanced technology.

For example, the Saudi Paper mills secure much of the water they need through a reverse osmosis process that recycles brackish water. And the company uses tons of waste paper – such as used newspapers, magazines, and old cartons – for its raw materials.

In addition, the company has optimized it business operations. Saudi Paper integrated its supply chain by establishing fully owned subsidiaries that specialize in waste paper collection. It now runs one of the largest waste paper operations in the region with paper collection, sorting, and baling centers extending from Morocco to the Arab Gulf states.

Saudi Paper also relies on cloud technology to deliver services to all its plants and warehouses. This now includes using SAP ERP powered by SAP HANA and the SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud service. Collectively, these business strategies help Saudi Paper focus on cost-aware production – an important capability in the narrow-margin and asset-intensive paper manufacturing business.

Low Oil Prices Bring Sense of Urgency

Megacities and industries like paper manufacturing represent new directions for the Saudi Arabian economy. And these days, the wisdom of diversification must be particularly apparent to the country’s government and business leaders.

The recent lows in crude oil prices have only helped to underscore the precariousness of relying on a single source of income.

Follow me on Twitter at @JohnGWard3.

You might also like this:

This story originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.


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Commerzbank Streamlines Financials and LoB Operations with SAP Solution

WALLDORF — SAP SE (NYSE: SAP) announced today that Commerzbank is now live with an integrated set of finance and risk solutions powered by the SAP HANA platform to create a digital business model.

As one of the largest banks in Germany, with €533 billion in assets and 51,300 employees worldwide, Commerzbank is working with SAP to digitally transform its operations for connected line-of-business transactions, simplified closing processes and regulatory compliance.

With the SAP Bank Analyzer set of applications, including the SAP Accounting for Financial Instruments application, Commerzbank is now able to close its monthly books significantly faster, and the bank has digitized production for all lines of business, including retail, commercial and investment banking. This results in continual compliance with German GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) regulations.

“On the background of a constantly changing regulatory environment, it has become increasingly important to maintain consistent accounting data for reporting across global regions and lines of business,” said Frank Annuscheit, chief operating officer, Commerzbank. “SAP is supporting Commerzbank in fostering a digital business model that helps us gain efficiencies.”

Commerzbank is now live with more than 70 percent of its balance sheet running on SAP Bank Analyzer and SAP Accounting for Financial Instruments, both powered by SAP HANA. The implementation helps Commerzbank to run reports more easily and simply, accelerate its closing processes and maintain compliance.

Required to provide regular reports to regulatory bodies such as the European Banking Authority, BAFin, Deutsche Bundesbank and others, Commerzbank trusts SAP to support the accuracy of accounting and financial data. SAP solutions, based on the in-memory computing technology of the SAP HANA platform, process massive quantities of data quickly to deliver precise reports in real time that help the bank satisfy its regulators in addition to its customers.

“The scalability and processing power of SAP HANA are huge for multinational corporations like Commerzbank, which have to cater to many different audiences at the same time,” said Luka Mucic, Member of the Executive Board of SAP SE, chief financial officer and chief operating officer, SAP SE. “The digital transformation goals of large banks demand comprehensive solutions that address a multitude of requirements across the entire organization. We are delighted to support Commerzbank in its digital enterprise journey, and we look forward to our ongoing collaboration.”

For more information, visit the SAP News Center. Follow SAP on Twitter at @sapnews.

Media Contacts:

Birgit Dolny, +49 (6227) 7-61664, birgit.dolny@sap.com, CET
Jill Fisk, FleishmanHillard, +1 (617) 692-0529, jill.fisk@fleishman.com, ET

Any statements contained in this document that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements as defined in the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “project,” “predict,” “should” and “will” and similar expressions as they relate to SAP are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. SAP undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. The factors that could affect SAP’s future financial results are discussed more fully in SAP’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including SAP’s most recent Annual Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of their dates.
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Thứ Ba, 22 tháng 3, 2016

Digitization: Changing the Utilities Customer Engagement

The buzz: Power to the people !

Mobile devices outnumber people on the planet, as 5.8 billion mobile users – 80 % of the world – connect via 8.6 billion devices (Radicati).

Predictions: By 2050, electricity, natural gas and water demand will double or triple. Energy and water usage will soar as vehicles and mass transit go electric to transport 10 billion people.

Implications: The global networked economy needs clean, dependable, affordable electricity. The utilities customer expects more.

The experts speak.

Robert Thiele, OpenText: “Men have become the tools of their tools.” (Henry David Thoreau)

Jacqueline Robinson, DTE Energy: “Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in a world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it.” (adidas Mission Statement)

James McClelland, SAP: “People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” (Theodore Roosevelt)

Join us for Digitization: Changing the Utilities Customer Engagement.



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Connected Care: Can Wearable Tech Improve Your Health?

The buzz: We’re all connected.

Little artificial companions like smart watches, smart tattoos, and smart pills are getting big hype about their promise to help physicians, scientists and patients make smarter health-related decisions.

How? By constantly measuring, collecting and reporting body traits, these smart devices can keep us all informed and poised to act faster if health needs change.

But can the devices deliver on their promises? Do patients want to be observed 24/7? Can this technology improve patient-doctor experiences? Is more data always better data?

The experts speak.

Manish Tandon, Infosys: “A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is reality.” (John Lennon)

Krishna Kumar, AppOrchid: “When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did–in his sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.” (PG Wodehouse)

Puneet Suppal, SAP: “That is why you fail.” (Yoda, The Empire Strikes Back)

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India’s Dream

Over my three plus decades traveling the world as a technology executive, I’ve visited more than 50 countries on the six inhabited continents of the world. I’ve witnessed breathtaking scenery and learned about distinct cultural traditions.

When people ask me about the challenges of leading a global company, I always remind them that diversity is an asset, not a challenge. Traveling across this beautiful world builds perspective, not complexity.

In that spirit, I just returned from a remarkable trip to India. I have visited on numerous previous occasions, each time departing with a unique sense of optimism and inspiration.

On one occasion many years ago, long before I was the CEO of SAP, I remember arriving well after midnight, probably closer to 3:00 a.m. Business travelers will probably relate to the series of airport mishaps that preceded my finally boarding the long-delayed flight to Mumbai. I was happy to be underway, even having been assigned the dreaded middle seat.

When I finally arrived, I was stunned to find SAP’s then managing director, the late great Ranjan Das, had come to the airport to personally welcome me. Some might make the mistake of thinking this was a savvy colleague looking for time with the boss. It wasn’t. People don’t play office at 3:00 a.m. It was his sense of pride and protocol that motivated him. It was his belief in the value of a tireless – sometimes sleepless – work ethic. It was him being humble and hungry. Ranjan’s gesture of kindness has always stuck with me, because in every exposure I have to the people of India, I experience an overabundance of these wonderful qualities.

The people of India aren’t afraid of hard work, they’re hungry for it. They don’t accept the limitations of the past, they fight for a better future. They’re not afraid to dream – for themselves, their families, their country and a better world.

Everywhere I went during my recent visit – from Mumbai to Bangalore, from summits with SAP’s customers and ecosystem partners to a speech at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay – I met women and men of consequence. They told me in no uncertain terms that India will rise up and take an even bigger leadership position in this world. Their minds and hearts are totally open to new ideas and new points of view on every topic. It was an extraordinary and emphatic reminder of why India has continued to attract foreign investment over the past 20 years. We’re committed to India precisely because of its people, their passion and their resolve to innovate.

That’s why India is the world’s fastest growing large economy, which is no surprise to anyone who spends time in this ambitious country. Some estimates say the India market could be €5 trillion by 2020 – huge by any measure.

It also shouldn’t surprise anyone that India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, has launched a “Digital India” initiative. It’s a progressive effort to leapfrog public services in other industrialized nations by modernizing infrastructure and digitizing the consumer experience. SAP’s commitment to the Prime Minister’s vision is made vividly clear by our recent pledge to open 25 centers for digital learning in 12 cities across India.

As my action-packed trip came to a close, my colleagues and I checked out of our hotel for the ride to the airport. It was nearly 2:00 a.m. There in the lobby of the hotel, with the city fast asleep, were members of the SAP India team. They came to show us the professional courtesy of a personal good-bye. That’s the India that I know and admire. A people, a culture, a country and a dream, all rooted in dignity, hard work and high aspirations.

As SAP celebrates 20 years in India, my imagination drifts to all that’s possible in the next 20. There’s no ceiling on India’s dream.

Bill McDermott of CEO of SAP SE

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Big Data Shines New Light on the Big Bang

SKA-MID-infographic.full

Infographic of SKA1 MID, the first phase of the SKA’s mid-frequency instrument (Via www.skatelescope.org).

The SKA is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope – with a collecting area of approximately one square kilometer. Set to begin construction in 2016, The SKA project’s major site will be in South Africa with a second large operation center in Australia, and thousands of antennae located across the world.

Collectively, SKA will be 50,000 times more sensitive than any existing radio instrument and its image resolution quality will dwarf that of the Hubble Space Telescope by 50 times.

Dr. Russ Taylor is the founding director of the Inter-University Institute for Data Intensive Astronomy (IDIA), a newly formed partnership of four South African universities that supports SKA with research conducted by the country’s top scientists.

“SKA will produce tremendous amounts of data, taking Big Data to the extreme,” he said. “Handling this data, turning it into information that can be shared and distributed easily, and extracting knowledge from it, will be one of the primary challenges for the project. It is a huge opportunity for the South African scientific and technology community.”

SAP Helps the Universe Run Faster

This is where SAP comes in. Mirroring the SKA project, SAP has assembled an international team to figure out if Big Data technologies from SAP can help deal with this data.

Elke Simon-Keller heads up co-innovation projects for SAP Africa and, located in France, Jean-Christoph Pazzaglia, directs product management for the higher education team at SAP. Last fall, they met Dr. Taylor, while participating in Africa Code Week. They began talking about how SAP HANA could help propel SKA – one of the South Africa’s premier science and technology undertakings.

Elke says, “Making sense of the huge amounts of data that the telescope will generate will be critical to the success of the research. If carried out correctly, this project has the potential to become the universe’s strongest validation case for SAP HANA.”

She continues, “To put this into context, the SKA project in South Africa will produce two terabytes per second of raw data. That is roughly enough data to fill 340,000 laptops with content a day.”

This data has to be transferred to the end user, reduced, calibrated and transformed into a 3D cube. Afterwards, the data must be analyzed and archived – a challenging and time consuming process.

International Task Force Shoots for The Stars

Meanwhile, back in Walldorf similar initiatives were underway. Klaus Schimmer works in the global security team at SAP but has a special interest in astronomy. In 2013, Klaus met with world re-known astrophysicist Professor Thomas Henning, director of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, and an expert in star and planet formation. They began discussing how SAP HANA could be used to address the Big Data challenges presented by the massive telescopes like SKA and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile, where Dr. Henning worked.

The next year one of Dr. Henning’s former students, Tatiana Vasyunina, joined SAP and formed a team with Klaus to determine howBig Data technologies from SAP could advance astrophysics. Recently, Franz Färber, the head of SAP HANA development, agreed to support the project.

Franz said, “These new telescopes create an almost unimaginable amount of data. This is a real challenge and we want to know how far we can go with our technology. Let’s see what SAP HANA Vora and SAP HANA can do in this situation.”

Virtual Pow Wow

All of these various activities culminated in a two-day workshop held in early March to explore how SAP could support the SKA’s Big Data challenges. This virtual meeting brought together SAP executives with executives and research experts from IDIA and the SKA project located in Cape Town, France, Heidelberg and Walldorf.

The Cape Town team held a design thinking workshop to refine the use cases for Big Data technology from SAP. In April and May, technical teams from SAP, IDIA and SKA and SAP will further develop prototypes during in-person workshops. This project is still in its exploratory phase but the discussion about how SAP can help the universe run faster have begun.

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